Not at all. Of the 3, one pseudo-patient's results were suppressed because it contradicted Rosenhan's thesis. Author Susannah Cahalan uses her personal experience of an autoimmune brain inflammation which masqueraded as mental illness (previously recounted in her best-selling memoir “Brain on Fire”) to launch her powerful documentary “The Great Pretender”. Her goal i. Cahalan's narration makes the reading great fun, with an urgency occasionally akin to a thriller. While I did get some new information from The Great Pretender, it was not nearly as much as I’d hoped. This information is important, but I can imagine many readers growing bored before they get to the point where the story begins to grow truly interesting. Critics' Opinion: Readers' Opinion: Not Yet Rated. Susannah Cahalan - The Great Pretender. 2- This really kills me, because as a psychology grad student and a big fan of Cahalan's. First of all, the promotional text on the front cover is somewhat misleading and doesn't give me warm fuzzies about the actual conclusions of the book. Susannah Cahalan is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness, a memoir about her struggle with a rare autoimmune disease of the brain. The synopsis from the publisher gave me an impression of a very different book th. This makes me wary because not only is it a misleading distinction, but it serves to further demonize or otherwise discredit those who do have mental illnesses. “Bold, brave, and original, The Great Pretender grips you as tightly as the madness it investigates. It wants to be a narrative about David Rosenhan and his 1973 pseudo-patient experiment. "Susannah Cahalan has written a wonderful book that reflects years of persistent and remarkable historical detective work. It just seems like a platform to further shout her disdain for psychiatry. In The Great Pretender, Susannah Cahalan wishes to write about mental illness and the ways that the system of psychiatry is broken. ", -Andrew Scull, author of Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity. Cahalan questions the validity of David Rosenhan’s undercover psychiatric study. "Susannah Cahalan has written a wonderful book that reflects years of persistent and remarkable historical detective work. The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness. The first half of the book gets bogged down by extensive histories of psychiatry as a science and as a practice, as well as the challenges of accurately diagnosing psychiatric conditions. Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. The Great Pretender audiobook by Susannah Cahalan, narrated by Christie Moreau & Susannah Cahalan. Cahalan's brilliant, timely, and important book reshaped my understanding of mental health, psychiatric hospitals, and the history of scientific research. The Great Pretender is an extraordinary look at the life of a Stanford professor and a famous paper he published in 1973, one that dramatically transformed American psychiatry in ways that still echo today. My main issue with this book is how disjointed it feels. Cahalan writes with enormous intelligence and style, and propels you through this dark and fascinating journey into psychiatry and the very nature of sanity.”, - Susan Orlean, New York Times bestselling author of The Orchid Thief and The Library Book, “People have asked me over the years: if they liked The Psychopath Test, what should they read next. She has followed-up that best-selling book with The Great Pretender, which exposes the suspenseful mystery behind an experiment that shaped modern medicine and mental health as we know it today. The Great Pretender is an extraordinary look at the life of a Stanford professor and a famous paper he published in 1973, one that dramatically transformed American psychiatry in ways that still echo today. I hold a BA in psychology, so I was already somewhat familiar with this study going into the book. THE GREAT PRETENDER THE UNDERCOVER MISSION THAT CHANGED OUR UNDERSTANDING OF MADNESS. The Milgram, the Stanford prison, those experiments on the effect of plate size on how much you eat, and even the great marshmallow of delayed gratification – the real story behind each of these being somewhat different from the marketing hype. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. She writes to seek help for both types of disorders, stating it is unfair to ignore either as if one type were someone’s fault. The Great Pretender by Susannah Cahalan. Forced to remain inside until they'd "proven" themselves sane, all eight emerged with alarming diagnoses and even more troubling stories of their treatment. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Susannah Cahalan is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of Brain on Fire: … The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness ... Susannah Cahalan. Susannah Cahalan's The Great Pretender is such an achievement. important and spirited" ― Observer "A fascinating piece of detection . “The Great Pretender,” by Susannah Cahalan Marion Winik is the author of “The Big Book of the Dead” and the host of the Weekly Reader podcast. From "one of America's most courageous young journalists" (NPR) comes a propulsive narrative history investigating the 50-year-old mystery behind a dramatic experiment that changed the course of modern medicine. However, I enjoyed this one so much that I decided to forgive you. I love psychology. In The Great Pretender, Susannah Cahalan wishes to write about mental illness and the ways that the system of psychiatry is broken. Share. The financial reimbursement structure had been made and that was the most significant cause of deinstitutionalization. Add to Calendar: Google; Yahoo; May 20, 2020. Start by marking “The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness” as Want to Read: Error rating book. The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness. If you are interested in psychiatry, then I would encourage you to take the time to read this book. It is an exploration of the David Rosenhan’s famous article, “On Being Sane in Insane Places” (Rosenhan, 1973). - Luke Dittrich, New York Times bestselling author of Patient H.M. "The pages practically turn themselves. [ Cahalan asserted that Rosenhan had exaggerated and falsified the "OBSIP" study. This probing account explores a pivotal 1970s experiment in which eight people, including Stanford psychologist David Rosenhan, entered American psychiatric hospitals in an undercover operation that changed the field of modern medicine. 'Destined to become a popular and important book' Jon Ronson 'Fascinating' Sunday Times In the early 1970s, Stanford professor Dr Rosenhan conducted an experiment, sending sane patients into psychiatric wards; the result of which was a damning paper about psychiatric practises. Her starting point was her own experience, when a misdiagnosis of schizophrenia almost kept doctors from finding her rare brain condition. This book is rather poorly written and its approach is exceedingly scattered. I just started listening to the audiobook of this one. It's destined to become a popular and important book.”, -Jon Ronson, New York Times bestselling author of The Psychopath Test and So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, “The Great Pretender is a tight, propulsive, true-life detective story which somehow also doubles as a sweeping history of our broken mental health-care system. This is a well written and well put together account of what happened. The research is there and I understand the point of the book, however, it seems like a book written only to support her lack of belief in the mental health industry while ignoring all the beneficial and essential treatments available today. I was wrong. It is an amazing achievement, and there is no question it will go down as the definitive account of one of the most influential psychology experiments of all time.”. Her goal is to raise awareness and treat both types with equal care and compassion, completely the opposite of causing demonizing of any type of mental illness. Decisions that have had lasting consequences on many, many people’s lives. To see what your friends thought of this book, Not at all. Brain on Fire was such a great book! Researchers have been unable to replicate some of its best-known experiments, leading many to now speak of a “replication crisis.” Of greater … In search of an answer, in the 1970s a Stanford psychologist named David Rosenhan and seven other people--sane, normal, well-adjusted members of society--went undercover into asylums around America to test the legitimacy of psychiatry's labels. For centuries, doctors have struggled to define mental illness--how do you diagnose it, how do you treat it, how do you even know what it is? As an author, I generally lose respect for writers who rate their own books. New York, NY: Grand Central, 2019. Perhaps this could’ve been a worthwhile article, but as a book, it lacks the sagacity of Brain on Fire. The actual purpose of the work remains elusive to the reader. There's something great about a paperback book: They're perfect book club choices, you can throw them in your bag and go, and they've been out in... For centuries, doctors have struggled to define mental illness-how do you diagnose it, how do you treat it, how do you even know what. It's a wonderful look at the anti-psychiatry movement and a great adventure - gripping, investigative. ISBN 978‐1‐5387‐1528‐4. She lives in Brooklyn. by Susannah Cahalan. “The Great Pretender,” the new book by the author of “Brain on Fire,” is another medical detective story, but this time the person at the heart of the mystery is a doctor, not a patient. When I saw Susannah Cahalan had a new book coming out, I knew I needed to read it. It's destined to become a popular and important book -- JON RONSON show more. Susannah Cahalan's The Great Pretender is a fascinating deep-dive into one of the most influential studies in the history of psychology, Stanford University professor David Rosenhan's 1973 paper "On Being Sane in Insane Places." It's destined to become a popular and important book" -- JON RONSON "Utterly compelling . I have always loved Susannah's enthusiasm and writing style and I REALLY enjoyed this book, but then at some parts, I felt that she was jumping between ideas; she would start with the history of a professor or a psychologist and before getting into the point of why she brought them up she would go into several rabbit trails. Rosenhan's watershed study broke open the field of psychiatry, closing down institutions and changing mental health diagnosis forever. For the experiment, Prof. Rosenhan and seven … . The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness. QA Susannah Cahalan The Great Pretender. @scahalan | susannahcahalan.com This item: The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness by Susannah Cahalan Hardcover CDN$32.10 Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). And learning that has proven to be deeply disturbing, because people have made real-world choices and decisions on the marketed version of those experiments. I hold a BA in psychology, so I was already somewhat familiar with this study going into the book. While I did get some new information from The Great Pretender, it was not nearly as much as I’d hoped. Susannah Cahalan’s The Great Pretender is such an achievement. If you’re going into this book expecting an in-depth rehashing of the Rosenhan experiment and its conclusions, you may be disappointed. Purchase this item now. First of all, the promotional text on the front cover is somewhat misleading and doesn't give me warm fuzzies about the actual conclusions of the book. ", -Ada Calhoun, author of St. Marks Is Dead and Wedding Toasts I'll Never Give, "Susannah Cahalan has written a wonderful book that reflects years of persistent and remarkable historical detective work. First Published: Nov 2019, 400 … Reading guide for The Great Pretender by Susannah Cahalan. Author Susannah Cahalan uses her personal experience of an autoimmune brain inflammation which masqueraded as mental illness (previously recounted in her best-selling memoir “Brain on Fire”) to launch her powerful documentary “The Great Pretender”. Part of the reason for this is that the focus of the book is not super specific. November 5th 2019 That there were not 8 participants but only 3. I loved Susannah Cahalan's first book: Brain on Fire, so I had to read her second book when it came out. I like this mentality so here I go! Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published And learning that has proven to be deeply disturbing, because people have mad. Refresh and try again. I'm having a difficult time deciding how I feel about this one. Search for more papers by this author. In “The Great Pretender” Susannah Cahalan provides a vivid account of Rosenhan’s “undercover mission”. The resulting article. Author Susannah Cahalan shares an in-depth look at a study from the 1970s that I had previously never heard of before but still affects the diagnosis process to this day. She writes to seek help for both types of disorders, stating it is unfair to ignore either as if one type were someone’s fault. A must-read for anyone who's ever been to therapy, taken a brain-altering drug, or wondered why mental patients were released in droves in the 1980s. ;-), Back in the early 1970s, Dr. David Rosenhan published the results of a study wherein he and several other people (so-called “pseudopatients”), none of whom had ever had mental health issues, attempted to get admitted to psychiatric hospitals by showing up and claiming they heard a voice in their head saying “empty,” “hollow,” and “thud.” All of them got admitted on this basis, most of them receiving a preliminary diagnosis of schizophrenia. It’s information heavy and quite dry at times, but full of interesting and thought provoking ideas and concerns about the field of psychology and psychiatry. She writes for the New York Post. I would recommend reading Brain on Fire first as it will add a lot of depth to and appreciation for the beginning of this book when Susannah talks about her ordeal being erroneously diagnosed with a mental disorder. Cahalan attempts to track down the people who took part in the experiment, she enumerates all of the valid criticisms of Rosehan's study, and she tells us random tidbits about the history of psychiatry. Part of the reason for this is that the focus of the book is not super specific. A sharp reexamination of one of the defining moments in the field of psychiatry. But without telling you why (spoilers), this book is all about undercutting what you know regarding the field of psychiatry. The great Pretender: The undercover mission that changed our understanding of madness, Cahalan, Susannah, New York, NY: Grand Central, 2019. p. 400, $28. Cahalan wrote a book about the Rosenhan Experiment in which unknown people posed as patients in unknown medical … I just started listening to the audiobook of this one. ", "Breathtaking! . “But once you’ve come face-to-face with real madness and returned, once you’ve found yourself to be a bridge between the two worlds, you can never turn your back again.”, “You have to look backward to see the future.”. And a thrilling, eye-opening read even for those who thought they weren't affected by the psychiatric world. Susannah Cahalan (born January 30, 1985) is an American journalist and author, known for writing the memoir Brain on Fire, about her hospitalization with a rare auto-immune disease, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. This is the year where I have gotten to learn that so many of the social psychology experiments I’d always assumed to have been completely above board are actually anything but. This is the year where I have gotten to learn that so many of the social psychology experiments I’d always assumed to have been completely above board are actually anything but. Very disappointing. However, her book is exactly that. Author, Slaughterhouse 90210 Susannah Cahalan was not okay. The Great Pretender is an extraordinary look at the life of a Stanford professor and a famous paper he published in 1973, one that dramatically transformed American psychiatry in ways that still echo today. If anything it reminded me with my conversations with my Ph.D. supervisor where 99% of the time we go int, I'm having a hard time deciding if this book deserves 4 or 5 stars. Journalist Susannah Cahalan discussed her book "The Great Pretender," about a 1973 experiment, led by Stanford psychologist David Rosenhan, that was conducted to test the legitimacy of psychiatric hospitals in America. Cahalan is honest enough as a writer to leave that question hanging, having presented important and spirited cases both for the prosecution and the defence. CSPAN May 17, 2020 8:00pm-8:59pm EDT. In some ways, I think it may have been a better long-form article than an entire book, and the digressions to flesh out the history were the parts where my int. Online. Susannah Cahalan's The Great Pretender is such an achievement. The Great Pretender does make references to Susannah’s experiences in Brain on Fire, so if you are interested in reading both I’d recommend reading Brain on Fire first. Grand Central, $28 (400p) ISBN 978-1-5387-1528-4. Over the course of a month she went from being a fully functioning young reporter to suffering from psychosis and hallucinations, a step away from being diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder. However, it does not deliver a cohesive detailing or explanation of the study. . In some ways, I think it may have been a better long-form article than an entire book, and the digressions to flesh out the history were the parts where my interest faded somewhat.

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